Ultimate Arrest Record Search Guide

arrest record search

Society searches for data at a record pace, everything from travel deals to the best restaurants. The majority of this data is searched online because of how easy it is to search from our mobile device or directly from our PC’s. Today’s advanced technology allows finding public data on people has become much easier and quicker.

Americans have become more cautious and rightfully so, one in 15 people have an arrest record within the United States.

Finding arrest records can take time and some persistence, but it can be done. We have put together a full guide on what an arrest record is, how the data gets indexed, and how users eventually find this data.

Below is a detailed list of everything a person would need to learn and implement a search on an individual within the United States.

What are Arrest Records?

In its simplest form, an arrest record is a person’s arrest and conviction history. These records may vary between jurisdictions within a country.

Who Stores Arrest Records?

Arrest records are stored at three levels; state, local, and federal authorities.

Why are these record stored on individuals?

These records can be used for many different things, some of the more common uses are by lenders to check the trustworthiness of an individual, employers to see if that person has every committed a crime, and the general public doing searches to find out who they are dealing with.

The general public may want to run an arrest record on a business partner, their child’s new coach, a new neighbor or any other reason they may think they need to find the truth about someone.

According to the FBI at least 620,000 people were arrested for pot possession in 2014. That is 1,700 people a day or more than 1 person per minute.

Access Arrest Records Now!

First Name

Last Name

State

Step-by-Step Arrest Process

arrest record search

When a person gets arrested a series of events follows. The arrest happens the second you are no longer able to walk away from the police offer.

The individual does have rights once arrested and this rule was passed in 1966 under the U.S. Supreme Court – Miranda v. Arizona. The individual arrested arrested for suspicion of a crime has rights that must be explained before questioning occurs.

This was developed so that you have the right to be free from self-incrimination.

The Six Rules:

There are six rules that apply to the use of testimonial evidence.

• Evidence must be testimonial
• Evidence must have been gathered
• Evidence must have been gathered while suspect was in custody
• The evidence must have been the product of interrogation
• Interrogations has to be conducted by state-agents
• Evidence must be offered by the State during a criminal persecution

Keep in mind that every U.S. jurisdiction may have its own regulations on what must be precisely said to an individual that is being arrested. The typical warning states the following:

• You have the right to remain silent
• Anything you say could be used against you in a court of law
• You have a right to an attorney before speaking to the police and also you have the right to an attorney present during any questioning
• If you cannot afford an attorney one will be appointed to you
• If you do answer questions now without an attorney present, you can stop at any time until you talk to an attorney
• Knowing and understanding your rights that were just explained to you, are you willing to answer questions without an attorney

The Pat-down

Officers may frisk or conduct a pat-down on the individual. This can be done on the outer clothing to rule out any concealed weapons. Users that are arrested could be subject to a full blown search of the person to endure no weapons, contraband, or any other evidence of the crime. Police can also search a subject’s vehicle as well.

Telephone Calls once arrested

Once the individual is placed in custody, depending on jurisdiction, that person may have the right to one or more telephone calls. Some states only allow that one call to be to an attorney. Users in most states can’t make this phone call until they have been booked.

Personal property or inventory

Police will take personal property and make the individual sign an inventory sheet, which will then be placed into a safe.

Booking Process

arrest record search

Individuals will be asked basic questions during this process such as address and birth date, then they will be photographed and fingerprinted.
The information that was provided will then be given to the appropriate prosecutor’s office.

This prosecutor will review this data to see what charges should be filed. People that have been arrested for a felony could see a grand jury review their case to determine what crimes he or she should be charged with.

Individuals that are placed in custody do have the right to a speedy trial. Typically this time frame is within 72 hours for a court showing

Arraignment Hearing

At the arraignment the charges against the individual will be read and they will be asked if they plead guilty or not guilty.

If the individual is placed behind bars

Making Bail

If the court posts a bail amount the individual may post bail and get off prior to trial. They will have to appear in court when told. People that do appear when asked will get their bail refunded.

People that skip on bail will not get there bail money back and a warrant for that persons arrest will be issued.

Keep in mind that serious crimes may not be entitled to a bail. They may be a flight risk, or be harmful to the public.

The judge is responsible for setting bail. The eight Amendment to the U.S. Constitution requires that bail not be excessive.

Finding the right criminal defense attorney

Have you been arrested or know someone who has? Finding the right criminal defense attorney can be your first step to settling your case. You can find Criminal Defense attorneys in your area by clicking on the link below.

find criminal defense attorneys

Remember it is always in the individuals best interest to seek professional legal help when possible.

Crime Statistics 2014 data

When looking at the number of violent crimes by state as a total we see that the number has dropped by about 0.2% in 2014 comparing this to the year before. Within the last 10 years we can also see a decline is violent crimes by nearly 14.5%

When looking at the data we can see that a violent crime rate was about 365.5 offenses per 100,000 people and property crime as about 2,596 offenses per 100,000 people.

Estimated numbers of Arrests in the United States – 2014 data.

Total


Murder and
Rape2
Robbery
Aggravated assault
Burglary
Larceny-theft
Motor vehicle theft
Arson
Violent crime3
Property crime3
Other assaults
Forgery and counterfeiting
Fraud
Embezzlement
Stolen property; buying, receiving, possessing
Vandalism
Weapons; carrying, possessing, etc.
Prostitution and commercialized vice
Sex offenses (except rape and prostitution)
Drug abuse violations
Gambling
Offenses against the family and children
Driving under the influence
Liquor laws
Drunkenness
Disorderly conduct
Vagrancy
All other offenses
Suspicion
Curfew and loitering law violations

11,205,833


10,571
21,007
94,403
372,685
237,974
1,238,190
68,422
9,394
498,666
1,553,980
1,093,258
56,783
141,293
16,227
88,946
198,400
140,713
47,598
55,456
1,561,231
5,637
102,336
1,117,852
321,125
414,854
436,014
27,380
3,274,430
1,310
53,654

Crime Statistics by State

(Data from FBI.Gov)

Data from January to June 20104-2015
Population by state by city of 100,000 and over.

State


Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
District Of Columbia
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

Population


4,822,023
731,449
6,553,255
2,949,131
38,041,430
5,187,582
3,590,347
917,092
632,323
19,317,568
9,919,945
1,392,313
1,595,728
12,875,255
6,537,334
3,074,186
2,885,905
4,380,415
4,601,893
1,329,192
5,884,563
6,646,144
9,883,360
5,379,139
2,984,926
6,021,988
1,005,141
1,855,525
2,758,931
1,320,718
8,864,590
2,085,538
19,570,261
9,752,073
699,628
11,544,225
3,814,820
3,899,353
12,763,536
1,050,292
4,723,723
833,354
6,456,243
26,059,203
2,855,287
626,011
8,185,867
6,897,012
1,855,413
5,726,398
576,412

Violent Crime


21,693
4,412
28,108
13,835
160,944
16,023
10,160
5,020
7,864
94,087
37,591
3,330
3,318
53,403
22,602
8,112
10,232
9,752
22,868
1,631
28,055
26,953
44,922
12,419
7,786
27,155
2,736
4,814
16,763
2,481
25,727
11,660
79,610
34,464
1,712
34,595
17,902
9,653
44,503
2,651
26,397
2,682
41,550
106,476
5,876
893
15,564
20,386
5,869
16,064
1,161

Murder


342
30
358
173
1,884
162
146
57
88
1,009
581
29
29
744
310
45
84
195
495
25
369
121
689
99
220
389
27
53
124
15
388
116
684
479
28
495
216
92
685
34
324
25
388
1,144
50
8
314
206
72
173
14

Rape


1,296
583
2,277
1,247
7,837
2,113
919
243
236
5,260
2,124
285
479
3,570
1,667
871
1,053
1,272
1,158
372
1,235
1,642
4,589
1,638
822
1,511
379
711
931
449
1,035
957
2,848
1,984
272
3,658
1,588
1,140
3,327
288
1,679
585
2,032
7,711
943
121
1,452
2,193
421
1,219
154

Burglary


47,481
2,950
52,934
31,890
245,767
26,157
14,711
7,371
3,519
153,563
86,789
7,979
7,186
71,101
47,612
17,096
18,767
29,587
42,140
7,461
33,732
34,540
65,665
25,378
28,076
42,466
3,894
8,735
22,120
5,444
42,338
21,384
64,553
99,323
2,377
103,421
35,731
21,901
56,859
5,949
45,086
3,258
56,181
204,810
12,943
3,965
29,511
60,725
11,291
27,945
2,125

Top 10 Most Dangerous and Safest States in the U.S.

Here are the most dangerous states to live in based off of a population of 100,000 people per state.

Alaska is the most dangerous state per 100,000 people

arrest record search

State

Alaska
Nevada
Tennessee
New Mexico
Florida
Louisiana
South Carolina
Delaware
Arkansas
Maryland

Crime per 100,000 People

636 per 100,000 people.
635 per 100,000 people.
608 per 100,000 people.
597 per 100,000 people.
540 per 100,000 people.
515 per 100,000 people.
498 per 100,000 people.
489 per 100,000 people.
480 per 100,000 people.
446 per 100,000 people.

Top 10 Safest States Within The U.S.

Here are the safest states to live in based off of a population of 100,000 people per state.

Vermont is the safest state per 100,000 people

arrest record search

State

Vermont
Maine
Wyoming
New Hampshire
Virginia
Kentucky
Idaho
Utah
Rhode Island
Minnesota

Crime per 100,000 People

99.3 per 100,000 people.
128 per 100,000 people.
196 per 100,000 people.
196 per 100,000 people.
196 per 100,000 people.
212 per 100,000 people.
212 per 100,000 people.
216 per 100,000 people.
219 per 100,000 people.
229 per 100,000 people.

List of useful FBI.gov pages

FBI most wanted
Most Wanted Terrorist list
Kidnappings and Missing Children list

List of Sex Offender Websites by State

Access Arrest Records Now!

First Name

Last Name

State

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *